Transformational Breath®
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Allergy and Chemical Sensitivity
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How does Transformational Breath affect people with various sensitivities?

Allergies, food intolerances and chemical sensitivities involve a factor of toxicity. When one becomes hypersensitive, the body is typically overloaded with toxins. Conscious breathing detoxifies and Transformational Breath aids in cleansing the body tissues and modulates the immune system appropriately. The result over time can be reduced sensitization. This detoxifying effect can work simultaneously to clear the mental and emotional components. Many breathers have completely overcome their allergies and sensitivities by using Transformational Breath for those symptoms.



Alternative and Complementary Therapy
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What do you think about the combination of TB and Hypnosis?

People who have studied hypnosis have remarked that TB puts them in the hypnotic state very easily. I believe it is because the connected breath we use accesses the subconscious which is the level worked at in hypnosis.

Would be it okay to receive acupuncture the day after a session to restore or balance the system? Or would this disturb the process?

Yes, acupuncture is wonderful to balance the energy that has been freed in the session and using flower essences is a nice ritual in addition. Clients who have had acupuncture after a breathing session have said their acupuncturists are amazed at the difference in their energy flow and bodies as a result. They also notice a difference in their clients' ability to hold the treatment better. This has also occurred in Chiropractic and Reiki treatments as well. So my overall attitude is that TB enhances all other therapies and the feedback I get supports this.



Arthritis
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A client has had Rheumatoid Polyarthritis for 20 years and is heavily medicated. How do we help them?

Case Study notes: The side effects of client's medication have seriously imbalanced her health. After 5 minutes of breathing, she gets a headache and pain everywhere increases. She also cries throughout the entire session. Toning is very difficult and increases the headache but after 4 sessions the relaxation induced does momentarily release her pain.

When folks get headaches in a session it usually means that the energy is not flowing freely in the upper chest and so that pressure builds up and is not being released, thus creating a blockage of energy in the head area. Try sitting her up and work mostly on getting the exhale to relax and a freer energy flow in the upper body / head area. This should help alleviate the head pain during sessions.

Physician's opinion [Reinhilde Dillen - Belgium]: Rheumatoid arthritis comes with a variety of systemic manifestations. Regarding increased pain, this can occur in sessions early on because the activation of the breathing moves the energy flow where it is obstructed. (In TCM, it is Qi stagnation causing the pain). The articulations (joints) are locked and the muscles are contracted and stiff so we have to move much like an old rusty bicycle. Perhaps the toning is too hard for your client. The vibration can go through the bones and so trigger the contraction of muscles in the neck and cause headache. Ask client if there is vasculitis. If not, don't worry. Keep on breathing with her. It is very good to let her energy flow and release the emotional blockages behind her pain. Continue light sessions and build up over time.



Asthma
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How can Transformational Breath benefit people with asthma?

Individuals experiencing the symptoms of asthma have a very conditioned breathing pattern that takes time and patience to restructure. The main problem is the tightening of the muscles in the "fear belt" or the solar plexus area, especially on the exhale. The most important thing to remember with asthmatics is that the problem is about being able to relax enough to let the air release on the exhale so there can be room for the next breath to enter the lungs. This can be challenging as asthmatics have a fear of "letting go" usually based on a time when they were unable to let go of their last breath because the next one did not come easily. They compensate by trying harder to breathe in more air which only aggravates the situation more and creates more tension in the solar plexus.

Good affirmations to work with are "I can get enough" and "It's safe and easy for me to breathe." The best approach is to have the asthmatic propped up while focusing on the solar plexus area and slowing the breath down until a relaxed exhale occurs. Progress may be slower with asthmatics as they have life-long issues with their breath. Often they are asked to complete the 100 Breaths exercise several times a day. During the session, we give them a sense of when they are relaxed versus when they are holding on to their breath. This will help them with their homework.

Propping the asthmatic up on at least a 45 to 90 degree angle helps them relax more, feel safer and makes exhaling a bit easier. Slowing the breathing down until they are able to relax is also a good technique to instill a more relaxed breath. Working with the affirmation "I let the breath come in and let it go out" can take away a lot of the effort. In some extreme situations, have them breath in and out through their nose. This is a way of breathing that supports a more relaxed state. It is helpful to address getting "enough" air, love and attention to address some of the major emotional components of asthma. Facilitators are guided in letting their intuition and experience guide them create a whole new relationship to breathing.

How does Buteyko, a shallow type of breathing, practiced by some asthmatics, compare with Transformational Breath?

The Buteyko or Boutako Breathing Method essentially tries to heal the symptoms of asthma by shallow and slow breathing. This helps relax the muscles that control the pattern, but do not really integrate any of the mental and emotional aspects of this condition. It does not give the breather the oxygen needed for integration. Part of the problem for asthmatics is being a mouth breather. We do use the nose breathing as an option for working with asthmatics.

We understand that the breathing problem with asthmatics is more about exhale and holding on to it with the muscles in the solar plexus. We work directly with that tension and have effective techniques to assist those muscles to relax thereby allowing the old air to empty from the lungs and thus creating more room for the new air (inhale) to enter. We also work on the mental and emotional aspects of the asthmatic condition and find it is very helpful in assisting the individual to resolve the condition on deeper levels. We monitor the oxygen and CO2 balance by insisting on a shorter, relaxed exhale, which keeps the CO2 levels from dropping.

Most folks with asthma who practice Transformational Breath in a committed way find their condition greatly improved or gone. For further information, read "Breath Deep" and come to a Transformational Breath session to find out how this process can support improved health in asthmatics.

I have tried the Buteyko method for Asthma and find it to be almost an opposite of your method. Please explain.

Yes, the Buteyko Method is quite different than Transformational Breath. They basically have you hold your breath out and minimize respiration so that when someone does breathe, it is from the need to breathe in and out in a more spontaneous way. This has been somewhat effective for individuals with the symptoms of asthma in helping them relax their strained breathing pattern. However, I do not believe it addresses any of the mental or emotional aspects connected with the restricted breathing problems. In general, my feelings are that the more oxygen in the system the better. Try both TB and Buteyko and see which process gives you the most.

What advice do you have for habitual "mouth-breathers ", and specifically, one with asthma?

Case Study: We use mouth-breathing in the very beginning of our journey with TB to allow us to access the lower parts of the respiratory system and lower chakras. As the breath opens and moves up we can switch to connected nose-breathing mixed with mouth breathing in sessions, or use nose-breathing to specifically work with the upper energy centers or the 3rd Spiritual Level.

In some cases with mouth-breathing clients with asthma I have actually coached them into nose-breathing early on in their sessions. Nose-breathing with them can allow them not to use the breathing pattern that is associated with their condition. Usually, when asthmatics have an "attack " they breath in forcefully with their mouth and then push the exhale while contracting the muscles in the diaphragm which does not allow the air to release and thus create any internal space for new air to come in. And then they try even harder to get air and the cycle gets worse. Sometimes nose-breathing will break this stressful breathing pattern and will allow the asthmatic to begin to breathe in a more relaxed manner.



Brain and Nervous System
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How can you work with an individual with Parkinson's Disease?

Yes, there have been individuals who have the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease and have achieved good results with Transformational Breath. It seems like the disease creates an imbalance in the nervous system that gets calmer and more balanced as a result of opening the flow of the breath and relaxing the exhale. Good pre-session coaching can help them get clear on how the condition has served them in the past and what they would like to create for themselves now. Sometimes individuals associate so strongly with their symptoms they are unable to see who they are. Toning will also help relax the nervous system. Turning a client with Parkinson's on their stomach may help their body unwind. Transformational Breath can be physically, emotionally and spiritually beneficial for an individual with the symptoms of Parkinson's Disease.

I have been breathing a client for 4 weeks, once/week. She is an RN and manages a critical care unit, lots of stress in what she terms a "toxic environment". She has been having major shifts take place in and after the sessions. She had a grand mal seizure (at work). She has never had one before and was hospitalized overnight.

It is not a surprise about what is going on in your client's life. I have worked with several epileptics now where they have had situations in their life they wanted to escape. One of the biggest things to watch for is what she does with her exhale. If she holds on to it at all or tightens her body then that is causing a buildup of energy that may release through convulsions or seizures. You can slow her down and diligently look for places where she is holding on or tightening up on the exhale and then put a steady strong pressure there until the muscles relax. You can also work with the affirmations, "It is safe and enjoyable to be here and now" and, "I can relax and let go". Also include some coaching about her life and what changes she can make for more joy.

I know 2 people that have Parkinson's disease who are very open to TB. Do you have any precautions or advice?

I have worked with a few folks with symptoms of Parkinson's and with good success. Mostly the results have been the reduction and sometimes elimination of the shaking and overall a feeling of relaxation. I feel that the breathing we do in TB definitely affects the nervous system and causes more balance and flow. I also would definitely monitor the exhale and keep it as relaxed as possible as this is one of the ways the body builds up excessive energy.

Case Study: One of our dearest Facilitators is also a Parkinson's patient. He writes: I started using TB in July of 1999. I have had Parkinson's for as long as I have been a facilitator. I believe that is why Judith popped into my life. I can honestly say that I have experienced a great calming in myself when I do the breathwork. I use it when I have difficulty moving around. I have been experiencing freeze-ups more often and that can be a real bugger when I want to move across a room full of people. I have learned to relax, close my eyes and just breathe deep into my belly and calm myself down. I use TB as a tool to relax and calm me, to help me clear my head and open up the channels to meditate. Yeh, TB is a powerful modality.

My sister has been given a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Have you breathed anyone with this diagnosis?

I have worked with several folks with the condition of Alzheimer's at various stages. Aside from age and family history, it is commonly thought that environmental factors are involved in the formation of the beta-amyloid plaques (such as heavy metals in the system), so breathing will certainly help the detoxification process and bring more oxygen to the brain, thereby allowing the brain to function more clearly and alertly. In addition, memory deficits are sometimes due to the brain not having the proper amounts of oxygen to stimulate brain cell activity. I know your sister will love it and do great.

Can I work with someone who has seizures?

Yes. I have found that folks prone to seizures usually tighten up on the exhale, especially in the solar plexus area. So I work pretty closely in those areas and coach them to relax a lot. Shortening the exhale helps prevent the tightening as well. If they seem to build up a lot of internal energy, toning helps release that and remedy imbalances in the electromagnetic field. If perchance your client goes into seizure, place your hand on their belly and coach them to breathe there and relax. Even apply pressure on the abdomen to help it relax more. I know it will go well.

Halfway though a session a man gets up and wants to leave the space, obviously in an altered state and not in his body. It was found later that he had a history of having epileptic seizures and had one that day.

If I understand correctly the man had a seizure during the breathing session in your workshop? I only had this happen once. However, I knew the man's condition prior to the breathing and was watching out. I went over to him and coached him to relax and put pressure on his solar plexus to assist in that. I made sure he could breathe and turned him more on his side. The biggest thing with those prone to seizures is that they tend to hold on to the exhale creating a build-up of energy and the body uses the seizure to release that energy. I know that is very general and yet I have worked with many with epilepsy and have found that to be pretty true and a good way to alleviate some of those symptoms. And some have actually had complete elimination of the seizures.



Cancer
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I have a client who has had breast cancer for 3 years. She has a hyperberic chamber but her oncologist told her not to use the chamber or do breathing since this would / could spread the cancer.

I am so surprised that a doctor would say that about conscious breathing anyway. There is nothing in medical science that would back that, but there is documented research to support the use of oxygen therapies in the treatment of cancer and other anaerobic disease. Otto Warburg won his Nobel Prize based on proving that a lack of oxygen is THE primary factor in the development of the disease. He showed that in cancer, anaerobic respiration replaces aerobic respiration (the Warburg Effect) as the disease progresses, meaning cancer cells can thrive in a low oxygen environment when normal cells cannot. This seems to make cell mitochondria (the energy producing centers in the cells) redundant. Further, when mitochondria shut down a damaged cell's ability to kill itself (programmed cell death or apoptosis) is short-circuited, further worsening the cancer situation. There is so much to address with this doctor's statement we could write a book.

Today, research is ongoing to leverage these ideas – essentially using a high oxygen environment as a weapon against cancer. I would suggest three things. First, she explore the doctor's position more thoroughly and maybe even get a second opinion. Second, you want to be sure and remember the emotional component of any disease must be addressed and breathing does it better than anything. Last, we don't recommend hyperbarics except in rare medical cases where a doctor may be right in its prescription. Hyperbaric pressures and the levels of oxygen they promote run the risk of causing oxidative damage to cells.

But let's be honest here, if I had listened to a doctor like that and avoided breathwork when I had cancer in my throat, I wouldn't be answering this letter.

I have a client who just received her last chemo treatment. What should I be aware of before working with her?

Chemo patients will have a lot of toxins in their body to discharge and may vomit or feel nauseous. Just have them breathe through it and know the body is clearing. It is good for them to have the understanding of the emotional connection between cancer and their feelings at whatever level they can accept.

A woman of 44 had a recent mastectomy to halt breast cancer. She will have chemotherapy as well. How do we approach breath sessions with her?

Working with someone after breast surgery and going through chemo is different than regular client work. They have a lot of toxins in their bodies so there will be detoxing going on throughout their session work. So for that reason alone it will be good to work with them on a regular basis. There will also be cellular trauma from the surgery, and emotional issues at the level of cause that will be addressed in the sessions. Sometimes the effect of the chemo is so intense that they will not feel like going into a lot of emotional pieces. So they may need time for that. Overall though it would be good to work at least once with them for all those reasons, as long as the client is up to it.

A client whose father had liver cancer told me oxygen and breathing is good for the body with cancer but not when the person already has a cancer diagnosis. Is this true?

[we had Nadja, a board-certified physician, answer this question.] Cancer cells are very different cells from normal body cells. In many ways they react and grow in different ways than a normal cell would do. This is the reason why they manage to grow so fast and big. (In fact, this is the reason why we have problems with cancer: due to the size and the disruption of normal bodily function). For these cells, it has been found that they do not thrive in well oxygenated areas in contrast to normal cells. They also maintain an environment around themselves which is full of fluid (they grow their own leaky blood vessels to help with nutrients – a process called angiogenesis). There has been a new piece of research which found that if you manage to change the environment around the cancer cell by improving the vessel system in the cancer, the fluid leaves around the cells and that the oxygen can penetrate to the core of the cancer. The cancer actually suffers because of this. In this particular research they proposed giving chemotherapy at that precise time to increase cell death. In practice, this is very difficult to time, as it is very rarely measurable inside the tumor. What it says to me though, is that the cancer cells do well in an oxygen-poor surrounding and do badly in an oxygen-rich environment. This is indeed a very different way of reacting to oxygen compared to normal cells. As we know, breathing has helped in the cure of different cancers and the above may be a part of the answer why. I feel quite confident in letting someone with cancer breathe. Also, from the standpoint of detoxification the breathing can help the body to clear any impact of previous chemotherapy sessions. As we know, these can have detrimental effects on healthy tissue. Of course, it should always be the client's choice should they wish to breathe or not.

A woman with lung cancer undergoing chemo/radiation last month had a reaction to a new chemo "pill". She coughs now intermittently and can't seem to get enough breath to get her energy back. Can TB help her?

In working with lung cancer and other lung conditions, the most important thing is to be sure they are using their diaphragm and relaxing on the inhale. This will naturally increase breath flow. Maybe a two-stroke inhale if they are able to relax. Affirmations of "accepting / expressing good" would be beneficial. She may be experiencing detox from the chemo, so advise her of that. For many reasons the breathing would be good for her now. Emotionally, it will help her deal with the symptoms at the level of cause.

[Case Study Follow-up:] Client was able to relax on the inhale and exhale. She said it felt so good to breathe in her belly, relating that her breath was stuck at the beginning in her sternum where a tumor is located. She couldn't wait to schedule again and is going to do the daily "100 Breaths".

My husband has Stage 4 lung cancer. Would TB help? Doctors want to start chemo and radiation within 2 weeks.

It is my experience that our process can assist folks with cancer, especially lung cancer, in a number of ways. For one, it allows one to maximize their breathing capacity, and it is accepted scientifically that the best way to deal with an anaerobic disease is with increased oxygen levels. TB also addresses issues on the mental and emotional levels, which is where the cause of most diseases begin. Since your husband's symptoms are in the lungs and we really give the respiratory system a training and workout this would help clean and strengthen his lungs.

Two women in their 60's have cancer and have undergone, multiple surgeries, chemo and radiation. I am unsure if I should start sessions or should I be patient and wait?

Breathing folks with cancer provides them lots of benefits: 1. More oxygen in the system, which targets the cancer cells and aids the immune system. 2. Working with the emotions and thoughts that contribute, or even cause, the condition. 3. Also giving the client a deeper spiritual connection, which at times of life-threatening disease is essential. 4. Detox -- they may feel the toxins from the drugs leaving the body and feel sick as they do -- and that is okay. It is better than keeping toxins in their system.

What recommendations do you have for breathing a client with cancer where the client is on medication and situation is in remission.

I would encourage him to see light going into every cell as he breathed and to also focus on getting in touch with the feelings and thoughts that help create disease in his body. This will allow the body to heal by working at the level of the mental and emotional causation. Also be aware of intense detox of the medication when they breathe (and this detox is good too). Have them drink lots of water.

My friends mom fell seriously ill after a diagnosis of cancer. Is there anything such as certain affirmations or passages or certain areas of touch her daughter can do to help open up the breath?

What a heartfelt situation. I would work with just having her breathe into her belly and relax on the exhale. At least that way she would be using her diaphragm and not the other muscles which create stress and tension in her body. This would also allow more oxygen to access the body and provide many benefits. If you or the duaghter feel tightness in her belly or abdomen when she exhales, increase the pressure on those muscles so they will relax more easily. Good affirmations for her would be, "It's safe to let go", "It's safe to trust", "I choose life, I choose breath", and "I let go and let God". It would be great if daughter can have mom breathe in and out without any pauses, this could cause her body to begin to activate (i.e. breathe automatically) and then the breath would go where it is needed on its own. It would give mom great peace. It would be great too if she could visualize light going into every cell of the body as she breathes in. And if everyone can remember that she is perfect Spirit and that part of her is guiding and supporting her through this journey.



Disabled
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A paraplegic woman, about 55, had her first breath session. It was a little difficult getting her in and out of her chair. She had a great belly breath, though she couldn't really feel in that area. Any suggestions on how to help such clients?

I have worked with paraplegics and sometimes it is okay for them to breathe in their chairs, leaning back on a pillow against a wall. Some have even felt energy and movement in their legs. Always secure enough help at events to get them up and down stairs. For comfort, one man even brought a portable bed to breathe on during his Seminar so it would be easier for him to get on and off. I would just treat them like a regular client as their breathing is not impaired and TB can bring them a lot.



Drug Use
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What effect does Transformational Breath have in individuals known to use recreational drugs?

Transformational Breath has proven to be a very effective practice for those individuals using drugs who are ready to recover from their addiction. It provides a direct connection with their "higher power" while healing the pain they have been trying to escape. People feel their innate wholeness with Transformational Breath so the desire for external fulfillment is lessened or gone. Many have experienced a breakthrough with Transformational Breath that eliminates their desire to escape or "get high".



Elderly
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How does Transformational Breath benefit the elderly?

There are some special things to watch for when working with older clients. One thing to be clear on is their intention to be being more alive as opposed to wanting to let go and leave. We are not agents of transition unless we do so with the proper conditions and arrangements. The process of death is the suppression of the spirit out of the body so many older folks have hard bellies and are unconsciously active in the process of pushing their Spirits out of their bodies. Once it is clear that their intention is "pro life" work a gentle fashion.

Spend as much time as needed to open the belly and begin to assist them in relaxing all the areas of chronic tension. This might take some time because of the many years of conditioned dysfunctional breathing. It would be good to get a health history so you are aware of any prior conditions. The most important factor is to support them in creating an open flowing breath so that the life force goes throughout the whole system and no areas get stressed or over-energized by breathing in just partial sections of the respiratory system. If done effectively, Transformational Breath can greatly increase the quality of health and vitality in a senior's life. It takes patience and gentleness!

I have read the chapter in your book about breathing seniors. My mother is 86. I was told that just toning without the pounding might be best.

Judith and Ange answer: With all breathers, it is good to know some physical history, e.g. surgeries, medications, and general physical shape. Eighty-six can look very different for different people -- as can, of course, forty-six. So for elderly who aren't so strong, or those very unfamiliar with this kind of work, at least start with toning without pounding, mainly so as not to exhaust them. Also pay a lot of attention to making certain they are in a position that is physically comfortable.

With seniors, breathing through the nose was recommended to me. Is this good advice?

I don't know why this would be preferred. First, I have learned never to preconceive about someone's breathing ability by their age, and have been quite surprised in the past by how open is the breathing of some seniors. Second, mouth breathing is fine and recommended during a session because it is easier to establish a connected breath and take in more healing oxygen, and in doing so, allows greater access to the lower parts of the body, and hence, lower chakras.

What general intentions should the elderly have during sessions?

Judith and Ange answer: Because people at this age are closer to leaving their physical bodies, for a facilitator at least, it is important to be clear that we are breathing for life, not for transition, or escape. With clear positive intention, and solid guidance, it is truly remarkable how much quality is added to seniors lives, not only through facilitated sessions, but also by using TB themselves in their daily lives.



Energy and Fatigue
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Do you have any experience with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

I have worked with individuals with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and have gained some insights into that condition. CFS is a condition which keeps sufferers at a very low energy state, low activity level, and a need to sleep a lot. Medically, it is said to be a complex, involving such things as a virus (EBV), and other microbial factors such as Candida overgrowth, as well as nutritional deficiencies, high stress levels, and even known drug side effects. In my experience with CFS, most people with this condition have very restricted breathing patterns. So by opening their breath and bringing more life-force in, they experience more energy right away and are also supported by a strengthened immune system. One of the things I noticed with individuals with CFS is that there tends to be a strong association with this condition and sometimes a payoff in not having to do a lot. So it is important to work with developing positive benefits and images of how life would be without the CFS. Sometimes breathing sessions will bring up symptoms as they are integrating. This should not be confused with the condition getting worse as opposed to part of the healing process. All of this should be explained to clients before the initial session to keep them motivated.

What advice do you have for facilitating a person with limited adrenal function as a result of prednisone use? Is it still safe to breathe?

We consulted 2 physicians to answer: We assume this client is on medication to supplement hormones. If you or the client have any doubt, have the hormone levels tested before and after a round of sessions. Usually, such people have a good idea when their hormone levels are low and often self medicate. One could always consult with the client's physician, then start with sessions gently, and then monitor the client's reaction. A breathing practice should not present a problem with a client in otherwise good health.

When the function of the adrenal glands is insufficient or ceases, you have what is called Addison's Disease. Absence or deficiency of adrenocortical hormones (like cortisol), muscle weakness, fatigue, and orthostatic hypotension are some early symptoms. Other effects include odd skin and mucous membrane pigmentations. Later stages may present weight loss, dehydration, fever, gastrointestinal disturbances, small heart size, decreased cold tolerance, hypometabolism, and even glucose intolerance issues. They can have more quick infections and fever. Acute adrenal crisis may result. Simply put, these patients can't adapt well to stress situations. Normally, they are treated primarily with corticosteroids. To approach breathing therefore, a well-treated patient will not present a problem. Do pay attention to danger of infection and the stress adaptation, and keep your client's sessions as gentle as needed.

A client with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) had one powerful half session. He says he's too tired and wants to wait until he feels better which could take months. Do I coax him to do sessions or let him decide what is best?

I can understand how you feel about wanting to follow through with your client. I have experienced similar situations with CFS clients. It is a condition that for whatever reason, maybe strong personal associations with the condition, that folks seem to have more resistance and fear of working through those patterns. What I usually do is when I know they are experiencing chronic fatigue, I prepare them beforehand that they might feel like stopping when the integration of the symptoms begins, and I ask for a commitment to continue with TB regardless if they notice they are feeling bad or have intensified symptoms. The ones who follow through get on the other side and have great results. Some have completely gone beyond all symptoms and are living very energized and productive lives. So it would be very good to keep encouraging them to breathe and let them know it is not a negative thing to feel some of the symptoms as they are clearing and that eventually they will get to the other side. I would also coach them into looking at who they would be without CFS, as sometimes there is a challenge to see beyond the conditions, so they stay stuck in their minds. In some cases there is even a payoff having a reason to not do certain things. I know your client will benefit if they continue with TB.



Facilitator Technique - General
QuestionAnswer
A client, who is 63, was 83 pounds but is now at a healthier weight. Do you have a suggestion for her about the Transformational Breath causing jitters in her?

Case study (name withheld): Client reports: "I'm having some difficulties. To date, I've been taking a very deep inhale, holding it for a second or two, then exhaling deeply, then waiting a second or two until I get the 'steam' up to start over. This has been very calming for me, always remembering that my system tends to work at very high speed -- to overheat, in a sense -- and that anything which spells 'calm' is welcome. Breathing faster and with no pause between the exhale and the new inhale makes me feel very jittery. I've really been very nervous today (unaccountably) and am having difficulty with this new routine. I know you're trying to build my energy up, but we also have to remember that anxiety and nerves are a big part of my MO. Do you have any suggestions or compromise positions for me?"

A. It sounds like your client is a Vata/visual type and high energy (in Ayurvedic terms). The breathing she does with the pauses is good for calming but will not do much integration. There is a way that the connected breathing can help calm her down. Be sure she is really breathing as deeply into her lower abdomen and belly as possible and you can slow it down and still keep it connected. If her breath is really open that breath should take her deep inside herself. If she is holding on or tightening up it will cause tension and nervousness. Also you can have her do the connected breathing through her nose that will help create a calmer energy.

A client experiences a "plane" of restriction in his head in most sessions. He experiences this as a flat plane with no front or back. He said he sometimes has this experience in stressful situations. Have any hints on moving head energy?

The "plane" on the head is a new one for me. My overall understanding of anything people feel physically is that it is energy moving or accessed and stuck. My approach would probably be to prop him up enough so that there was movement in the "upper upper" chest, so that energy flow would be restored to the very top of his body and beyond. Then maybe the plane would take off.

What is happening in the body when you put weight on an area where there is no breath? Or, why does breath move into the area where you add pressure?

My experience is that when you put weight on someone's stomach, for example, while they lay on a hard surface, the pressure causes the diaphragm to engage and help correct the breathing pattern. It also collapses the muscles in the chest and back that have been keeping the breath shut down. Thereby expanding and freeing the breath. This position also helps people feel safer in expressing their emotions.

A 28 year old athlete with a strong belly breath and very controlled exhale, flipped into reverse breathing when I got him breathing into his chest. The only way I could get him back to regular breath was to belly bag him, which took away his chest.

Without having seen your client I cannot say for sure how I would bring the two parts together. One thing that I have found effective to smooth out someone's breath is to turn them on their stomach, arms facing towards their head. Then check out where the breath is going. If it is in the belly then put some weight on their upper back. (I usually lay my chest on them). If just the upper back is going up then I put the weight on their lower back and buttocks. You can tell if it is effective if you feel or see that area begin to rise and fall. This process usually takes a while so have them stay in that position so the breathing pattern can become grooved. Also, you could keep him on his back, prop him up and have him breathe in very slowly. Start in the belly and gradually bring it all the way up. It would be better to work with them in a private session because of the attention it might require to get his breathing coordinated.

I have a client with a breath that jumps from abdomen to chest, skipping the middle. And interestingly, she directs me on what to do, insisting on doing everything her way. The surrender issue seems big. Advice?

Not seeing your client breathe I can only go by what you have observed which to me sounds like a classic split between the heart and will, and which sometimes shows up in people's lives in different ways. Mostly, a split between someone's heart and ego ... it could be work, relationship, life purpose. It is not so important that the client "cop" to their breathing pattern, but for us to help them integrate that split. I bet if you talked to her more you would find the area of her life where that lack of integration existed. Sometimes turning them on their stomach helps break down that tension in the solar plexus, or pushing on the sides of the ribs also reduces the tension on the diaphragm.

How can you work with individuals having difficulty relaxing the jaw?

It is not unusual for someone to have a very tight jaw. It is one of the primary spots for holding on to emotions, especially anger. If you tried using a mouthpiece (cut off top to a plastic water bottle) and that was not successful, apply firm and steady pressure along the jaw line. Toning and massaging the jaw bone on the cheek is also a good way to begin to relax the jaw. If you are not sure about pressure or places, try it on yourself first to get a sense of how firmly and the exact spots to help release the tension.

As a facilitator, how do we handle a client's huge arousal of 'Kundalini Energy'. I have seen fear and avoidance of sessions when this occurs.

Experiencing Kundalini energy is not unusual in TB. As a matter of fact, the movement of the Kundalini energy is one of the main activities that happens in a TB session. As the breath opens up from the bottom of the respiratory system to the top, it activates the movement of the life-force, i.e. Kundalini energy. In times past, people have been warned about the dangers of the Kundalini energy opening too fast. I can understand that concern. However, when the raising of this energy happens from bottom up, coordinated with the movement of their breath, it happens in a safe and integrated way.

The raising of this energy represents the raising of one's consciousness and the opening of the corresponding chakras. If it were my client I would let them know that in TB sessions it is a safe and regulated way to raise the Kundalini. It is guided and supported by our higher selves and Beings of Light that have been invoked. Part of our enlightenment process is the raising of this energy and using it wisely in our lives.

Why have some of my clients appeared disoriented or scared initially after a session?

When this happens, the individual is often integrating all the past traumas and desires to leave and disassociate. Working with affirmations that set up more willingness and joy to be here is a good idea. The individual may have left their body and returned quickly, not remembering what to do or where they are. It could also be the memory of first coming into their body at birth and feeling the panic of being in a body. By assuring the individual that they can breathe and it is safe to be in their body, the pattern will integrate. There are some points on the body that are used to help create more grounding after a session.

How do we work with people who shake a lot during sessions?

Shaking during sessions is fairly common. It is usually caused by a holding on during the exhale. Energy builds up and the body deals with the excessive energy by shaking. The best way to work with shaking is to relax more and look for the muscles that are tightening up on the exhale. Ideally the whole body is relaxed on the exhale, so any tension on the exhale is a form of holding on. Putting pressure on those muscles and holding firmly on both the inhale and exhale will cause those muscles to relax and the energy to flow more freely. Start putting pressure on the solar plexus area, belly and lower back then search for any other places of tension. This will eventually retrain those muscles to relax naturally. Affirmations of trust and letting go are helpful too. If the shaking gets overwhelming, then toning would be beneficial.

A new male client wants to set up all 3 of his first series for the same day since he doesn't live nearby. Any advice about facilitating this kind of intense succession of sessions?

I see no problem with scheduling sessions so closely. We breathe in the Seminar sometimes 3 times in one day. However, I would just be in the moment with him on the day of his sessions and see how he is doing and keep checking in with him as to how he feels and if he wants to continue. He sounds like a go-getter and yet might not be aware of how powerful TB is. Do your invocations and trust Spirit to lead you both. He sounds like someone who would really enjoy the Seminar.

First session with a 65 year old male: Breath was in his chest. Nothing in the belly. After coaching him into his belly, the chest shut down completely with belly inhale quick and sharp. Trying to loosen the belly with pressure during exhale resulted in resistance.

Sometimes when someone has been breathing in an unbalanced way for a long time, in order to create balance (and ultimately that's what TB does) they go off in the other direction for a while and then eventually with good coaching find their middle ground. I have seen this exact thing happen many times, where one finally opens their personal will and gets grounded, they get into it strongly for a while. Do a private with him and openly discuss his breathing patterns and how you would like to help him create balance between the heart and will. Maybe start with a two-stroke breath or have him hold the breath out for a while so he is forced to take some big deep breaths. Turn him on his belly and that will lessen the control aspect. I would also have him put his hand on his heart so he can feel when he breathes there or not. And if his belly has been shut for 65 years, then maybe he needs to hang out there for a while. If all else fails have him nose breathe to lessen the control factor.

I have a client who finds it difficult to breathe on the floor (hard to get up and down with a hurt back). May we do sessions in a recliner? She also had feelings of lightness and imbalance at the end of the session.

It would be okay for her to bring her recliner to sessions. In the past we have used other things when folks have challenges getting up and down from the floor. I would avoid the leg compression, if elderly or in frail condition. It would probably be good to hold her feet at the end of the session to help balance and ground her energy. The pattern will eventually integrate, and I feel it would be good for her to do a week-long event.

A Colon Therapist was forced to earn a massage license through her state in order to practice. She said be careful of what I say and how I say it because the state might view facilitator's touch as a grey area, or that if we are not 'licensed therapists' we should not be involved with anyone's 'subconscious'. Any advice?

I would not be concerned, and yet that is one reason we created the ministerial program so that people, where the laws in their state do not allow them to touch other people as a lay person, they can as a minister. And yet, having professional massage training is good as it can only enhance your hands-on skills as a facilitator.

A client noticed I prop her up to breathe, and others I do not. She wondered if it is the goal to be able to breathe openly while ultimately lying on the floor and not having to be propped up.

We prop clients up for a number of reasons. One is to use gravity and the more graduated angle to help open the chest. Also, folks feel a bit safer propped up as opposed to lying flat on their backs. For the most part, about 85% of the people I work with fit into this category and seem to reach a fully open breath more easily in this position. The folks who look like their breath is open lying flat may still have some upper chest closure which is easier to open when propped up a bit. Those who need to be flat initially are the ones who do not breathe in their lower respiratory system (i.e. belly), then sometimes they transition into being propped up once that area opens. It is wonderful we have the knowledge and ability to change positions for people based on their breathing patterns. No other breathwork pays attention to this.



Heart and Circulatory
QuestionAnswer
How can you work with individuals with cardiac problems?

Individuals with heart problems are can receive benefits from TB. We understand that many heart problems occur from strain created by a restricted breathing pattern. This limits the flow of oxygen and the life- force to the heart area causing a build up of internal pressure due to improper energy flow. Initially, we work carefully with helping the client with cardiac problems to fully open their breathing to eliminate the pressure and strain acquired from their old breathing pattern. This lessens the efforts of the heart as well. They are also encouraged to open their emotional heart and feel freer in expressing their feelings and love.

There are dramatic studies from a hospital in London showing conclusive results about the benefits of full diaphragmatic breathing with pulmonary conditions.

Do your events have any restrictions with someone who has a defibrillator/pacer installation? His breathing and health are now generally okay, but breathing is noticeably shallow and fairly rapid.

We focus on opening and strengthening the entire respiration process. So that shallow or weak breathers expand their capacity and strengthen their breathing abilities. A weekend event would be very good and helpful for your husband. We have not had any problems in the past from participants with pacemakers or defibrillators. We work with folks with heart conditions in very specific ways, making sure there is a fully open breath that allows a balanced and even flow that permits energy to move freely through their field as opposed to restricted breathing that builds energy up internally thus causing stress and pressure.

Is a client with a history of TIAs (mini-strokes), hypertension (controlled by medication), and pressure in the head able to attend a TB workshop?

TB has been very effective in lowering high blood pressure, and also is a wonderful way to create energetic balance and relieve internal pressure, which is a component of the two basic types of strokes (ischemic and hemorrhagic). The way I approach TIAs (Transient Ischemic Attacks) is to make sure the client has an open flowing breath as our top priority, even if we have to slow the breathing down or keep repositioning them until their breath has an open flow. This keeps the energy in the system flowing and does not allow internal pressure to build up. So I would welcome working with someone who has these conditions and would always make sure their breath was open enough to keep their energy flowing, especially when the breathing brings in so much energy into their system.

A man with Angina, and quite overweight wants to breathe. Is it okay?

There are no contraindications here – when working with someone with heart conditions, just proceed with due attention. If anyone has medical concerns I suggest they consult their own doctor regarding breathwork. Get as much information as possible beforehand and spend time finding out what makes them feel at ease. If clients are dependent on medication, have that on hand. Such clients are unlikely to have much, if any, breath in the chest and so will almost certainly need to be propped up and made comfortable; give adequate head and neck support, especially if elderly. The session would typically focus on getting a gentle, connected breath through the whole respiratory system and beginning to open up the chest or other closed areas. Offer encouragement and affirmations, but keep pounding and toning toward a minimum - although sometimes elderly and fairly infirm clients enjoy the toning especially and may find it beneficial to move too. Initially, I would not recommend our Kundalini movement before sessions until improvement is noted.

I will be working on a woman with a pacemaker. Is there anything special I need to know? What would be the indicators that I am working her too hard?

I believe it would be good to start your client off gently and be sure the air is accessing the entire respiratory system, so start with them propped up. I would definitely go for flow as opposed to getting the client activated or volume. Most important is the energy to the heart and relaxing fully on the exhale. I would limit some of the more intense physical things we do, (i.e. arm and leg compression, pounding and kicking.) After the first session you will have a better sense if these other techniques are appropriate.

A client, around 50, with 6 sessions behind him, spaced 10 to 15 days apart, informed me his pulse was high - around 90 bpm. He never checked it in the past and wonders if it is related to the breathing.

If he is in the right position and the breath is moving through his whole body, (i.e. from top to bottom) then there should not be any problems. Pulse and blood pressure would actually drop and normalize. So make sure the breath is really moving in the chest and starting from the lower belly. This will insure energy is not building up internally. If you need to slow the breathing down until this happens, then do. Be sure and prop him up as well as this allows a better flow.



Infants and Children
QuestionAnswer
How can Transformational Breath be done for infants?

There has been great success in breathing newborns. The technique we use for working with babies is as follows. First we contact the soul or Spirit of the baby and ask permission to work with them. We then invoke the perfect session and ask for spiritual support. We hold the baby so that we can put a finger or two on each side of their abdomen. This creates an electrical circuit that brings the breath into the lower part of the respiratory system. Their belly begins to rise when they breathe in and fall when they exhale. The baby's breathing rate is faster than ours so we need to entrain with their rhythm. Before long their breath will activate allowing the birth and other repressed traumas to resolve and integrate. Many newborns after opening the lower respiratory system have better digestion, more peace and sleep better.

What are the benefits of Transformational Breath for consoling a child that cries a lot?

Unfelt or unexpressed feelings can do a lot of internal damage which only results in external problems or illnesses. In Transformational Breath, we encourage individuals young and old to fully feel and express their feelings as they come up in their sessions or in their lives. When the feelings arise we show them how to breathe or sound through them so that they are able to resolve them by changing the energy pattern.

In working with children, validate how they feel and let them know we understand how they feel and that it is okay to express those feelings. The other option would be to make those feelings not okay and have them suppress them. This causes these feelings to be buried in the unconscious and cause possible problems or dis-ease in the future. Tell children, "It's okay to feel your feelings", "Make the sounds of your pain", "It's good to express". In those situations, it can be very healing to process the feelings on the spot as opposed to trying to squelch them inside. Sometimes healing is not all neat and quiet but consists of deep feelings needing to be expressed. Toning and breathing can assist in transforming the energy of those emotions.



Lungs
QuestionAnswer
Is it okay to do Transformational Breath when one has had pneumonia and blood clots in both lungs? Can deep breathing move a clot?

I investigated this with a Medical Doctor / Facilitator of ours:

"Our own Nicole had an experience with a lung embolism when she was very ill. She was in intensive care and did the breathing and saw the parameters on the monitor increasing and improving. Now, each blood clot condition has to be treated with anticoagulants because they can move and cause infarction when they obstruct the blood vessel, but the idea that deep breathing can move a clot and cause infarction is only speculation. I have verified this with a lung specialist, and there is no known danger. I also have found nothing in the medical literature to support this fear. Also, when you have a narrowing of the blood vessel, good ventilation can stimulate the collateral circulation, so that region receives more blood again. Even after an infarction, by breathing well, the other parts of the lung can compensate for the condition. So my conclusion is: keep on breathing but treat the blood clots! A pulmonary specialist I know in fact finds deep breathing is appropriate for all lung conditions except pneumothorax.

"Also, when you have a narrowing of the blood vessel, good ventilation can stimulate the collateral circulation, so that region receives more blood again. Even after an infarction, by breathing well, the other parts of the lung can compensate for the condition. So my conclusion is: keep on breathing but treat the blood clots! A pulmonary specialist I know in fact finds deep breathing is appropriate for all lung conditions except pneumothorax."

A man had a single lung transplant to offset idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis seven years ago. Would Transformational Breath help him?

Background: Client reports his quality of life has not improved significantly since the transplant. He retains a moderate saturation rate without supplemental oxygen when sedentary, but with mild exertion, becomes short of breath.

Comments: It is safe for a transplant patient to breathe with us but realize that getting a new lung does not mean effective respiration. Most folks have restricted breathing patterns, so getting a new lung does not remedy that. I strongly recommend doing a few sessions and do what you know to open his breath, get him breathing with his diaphragm and help open the upper chest and connect his breathing pattern. I am sure TB will improve his overall breathing and oxygen levels. If he is pleased you might want to refer him to a week-long Seminar to further assist him in strengthening his respiratory process.

A client in her 70's has been diagnosed with emphysema. Doctors say there's nothing she can do to restore elasticity. She's a non-smoker who's had asthma since childhood and has depended on inhalers for relief.

In my experience, I have seen great improvement in clients with the symptoms of emphysema. I am not sure if the breathing becomes more effective due to elasticity being restored in the lungs, or if working so intently with integrative breathing brings into action parts of the lungs that have not been used or damaged previously. Either way working patiently with those with emphysema can help. I have noticed these people have a lot of tension in the diaphragm which learns to relax in TB and that also assists in the opening of the respiratory system. This, like asthma, takes more time and patience as we are working with pre-existing breathing conditions.

A woman with lung cancer undergoing chemo/radiation last month had a reaction to a new chemo "pill". She coughs now intermittently and can't seem to get enough breath to get her energy back. Can TB help her?

In working with lung cancer and other lung conditions, the most important thing is to be sure they are using their diaphragm and relaxing on the inhale. This will naturally increase breath flow. Maybe a two-stroke inhale if they are able to relax. Affirmations of "accepting / expressing good" would be beneficial. She may be experiencing detox from the chemo, so advise her of that. For many reasons the breathing would be good for her now. Emotionally, it will help her deal with the symptoms at the level of cause.

[Case Study Follow-up:] Client was able to relax on the inhale and exhale. She said it felt so good to breathe in her belly, relating that her breath was stuck at the beginning in her sternum where a tumor is located. She couldn't wait to schedule again and is going to do the daily "100 Breaths".

My husband has Stage 4 lung cancer. Would TB help? Doctors want to start chemo and radiation within 2 weeks.

It is my experience that our process can assist folks with cancer, especially lung cancer, in a number of ways. For one, it allows one to maximize their breathing capacity, and it is accepted scientifically that the best way to deal with an anaerobic disease is with increased oxygen levels. TB also addresses issues on the mental and emotional levels, which is where the cause of most diseases begin. Since your husband's symptoms are in the lungs and we really give the respiratory system a training and workout this would help clean and strengthen his lungs.

A lady in her 60's suffers from COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder). She complained post-session of a sore and hoarse throat that persisted for weeks. She lost her voice and would not come back for another session.

Physician's Opinion: Your client claimed that her throat symptoms were due to the open mouth technique of Transformational Breath and that her symptoms are not improved. I agree with Judith's initial assessment that her techniques did not cause the sore throat. I say this because COPD patients are typically treated with 'inhalation puffs' which can cause sore throat and hoarseness -- especially the corticoid inhalers. It is possible, however, that the open mouth breathing accentuated the side effects of the puffs together with a possible detoxifying pattern which we might normally expect from an active breathing practice.

Any insight on a male client on ventilator? His condition had seen 2 years of continuous hospitalization with bouts of pneumonia, emboli, heart issues. Very involved.

I have worked with several on a respirator and what I found out was that you can still do TB in that situation. The respirator induces somewhat of a false breath, causing the breather to tighten up on the exhale and sometimes they are using their chest muscles instead of the diaphragm. So encouraging the belly breath and relaxed exhale is a good place to start. If possible, if the pace on the respirator is too fast, then it could be adjusted to slow it down a bit to gain a more natural rhythm. It will help create better breathing function and more expansion.



Mental and Emotional
QuestionAnswer
What do you think about the combination of TB and Hypnosis?

People who have studied hypnosis have remarked that TB puts them in the hypnotic state very easily. I believe it is because the connected breath we use accesses the subconscious which is the level worked at in hypnosis.

A woman, with an eating disorder, self-described as stressed, sad, discouraged, and anxious has been on sleep meds for years but still is sleep deprived. She's afraid feelings may come up to overwhelm by reliving trauma and abuse.

I've had clients who have been very afraid of what might come up in sessions and the light-headedness that they feel when the oxygen goes to the brain. First of all, I ask them what would they rather do, keep those traumas in the subconscious and have them continue to influence their lives or possibly feel them as they are leaving. If not dealt with, they will make someone sick, which seems to be having a toll on her already. The lightheadedness disappears once someone is activated and they lose body consciousness. Eventually she will have to accept both experiences in order to go through them and be free. I would keep encouraging her and trust your intuition to guide you as to how far to go each time. I believe once you get her activated the issues would move very fast, so my approach would be to encourage her to go for it.

A chest breather, with no breath below her navel, reports low back pain, digestion problems, and gets "taken advantage of". I felt she was in her heart and probably made most decisions with her emotions. She disagreed saying she analyzes everything and makes decisions through intellect. She asked where do I see that?

In some ways it might seem contradictory. If she is just breathing in the upper chest then her personal will is not developed and she tends to be spacy. I see folks who are heart breathers as loving and not grounded or totally focused. They also need to develop personal will [may relate to getting "taken advantage of"]. I do not associate being in the mind with a heart breather (and face it, we are all in our minds) so it is not a true characteristic or correlation. The belly breather has a strong personal will, ego motivation, and are not too much about expressing or being totally in touch with their feelings. They are pretty grounded and more in their mental and lower chakra expressions and they have integrated more in the subconscious than an exclusively upper chest breather would have. Hope that clarifies, but know that each person is a unique individual and may not fit exactly in our evaluations.

How do you deal with major emotional releases during a TB session?

In Transformational Breath, we prefer emotional integration instead of emotional release, because we are essentially not releasing anything , nothing jumps off us like little fleas. In Transformational Breathing, we are permanently transforming lower vibrational energy patterns into higher ones, which is a form of integration. When someone in a session is experiencing strong emotions brought on through a memory or painful thought, we encourage them to continue to breathe and if that is difficult to make loud clear sounds to complete the transformational journey they have begun. When they are re-experiencing these emotions, they are in the process of integrating their feelings. Breathing or toning will take it to completion. No matter how intense the feelings are, they are just in a process of remembering. The most difficult part was the real experience itself and it has already happened so the breather is merely healing that memory.

How can an individual quiet the "chatter" in their heads and have a great Transformational Breath experience?

It is unusual when the mind chatter continues in a session. There are several possibilities why this may be occurring. One is that the individual is not activating and their mind is still engaged. In this case, work on eliminating pauses in breathing and releasing muscles that appear tight on the exhale. It is possible to be fully activated and have thoughts which are integrating while the individual is aware of the "chatter". Letting go of any judgments about one's mental activity is also helpful. Physical stimulation of through Kundalini (breathing and moving), pounding and kicking, arm and leg compression will activate the breath even more and help resolve this type of situation.

How many TB sessions will it take to see a reduction in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)?

Case Study: After 3 sessions, a 12 year-old boy has trouble staying focused. Since age 7 1/2, he has multiple daily thoughts of throwing up. Almost any physical sensation or stressful situation is interpreted as a sign of imminent vomiting, though he has not thrown up again. His mother is now considering a psychiatric evaluation and further counseling.

I would be encouraged to work with him on a one-on-one basis as I feel there is definitely some emotional issues going on and the breath to me is the fastest route to resolving them. I would ask both he and his mother for a commitment of three more sessions to be able to get to the root cause and then re-evaluate at that time. I would also give him some homework of 100 Breaths, especially when the feelings of throwing up arises, and to be prepared to go through some gagging reflexes as well to integrate that piece.

I would also do Byron Katie's "The Work " with both to look at the story and see how much they were invested into it and help them investigate the reality of their thoughts. I sincerely think the breathing would be effective if he was motivated in some way to commit to it.

After one of my self-sessions I went into a big depression and have not been able to move through it. Sometimes I feel hopeless and defeated and wonder if I should continue on this path.

What you are going through is not uncommon and my experience has shown me that if folks stick with the breath and the other tools that we have that sooner (we hope) or later they get to the other side. What I have noticed over the years is that the more light someone has the bigger the pieces of darkness they have chosen to overcome ... so know that someday all that "stuff" will serve you. Just know that the suppressed past is just that and the authentic self and energy is what is real.

I attended your Seminar (my husband's idea) and had the most profound experience of my life. Since then, my life is falling apart. My husband and I are on the verge of divorce and he refuses to seek counseling together.

I am very sorry to hear about the situation with you and your husband. I do remember you both very well and felt very connected to you. It seemed you both did very well at the Seminar and got a lot out of it. I also remember that your husband had really opened his heart and maybe that seems scary to him back in the world environment and he needed to pull back to protect himself. If this were my situation I would pray for the highest for all and then trust what happens. Sometimes after such a big week folks need some space to find out who they are and what they are here for outside of all relationships. I know the highest and best will happen for you both. Breathing for you, or both of you, would help create more clarity and strength. And you can only choose for you. Please know I am here to support you if I can.

As a social psychiatric nurse and therapist I work with patients diagnosed with Dissociative Identity Disorder or 'DID' (formerly: Multiple Personality Disorder). Have you used TB with a patient with this diagnosis? Should I recommend a Seminar?

I am glad you are investigating the application of Transformational Breath for helping DID. I have had a fair amount of experience with it and have had dramatic results. It is however a condition that I would not recommend a Seminar as their first approach, as they might need special attention and additional support in going through the integration of the different personalities. I also feel when they start working with TB that their facilitator should be in touch with their therapist / psychiatrist so there can be an open dialogue and they can receive help on several levels. I feel that TB has the ability to address some of the core issues related to the causes of this condition and allow the client to permanently heal.

Do you have any success / experience working with children with ADD or Autism? What are the changes that take place with these children?

I have had the wonderful and interesting experience of working with children with ADD and autism. The results have been very good. Each of those conditions are approached differently. With autism, for some reason, the child has withdrawn their attention and awareness from their physical world. I have found the most important feature in working with children with these symptoms or diagnoses is simply that they be present and willing enough to follow instructions and breathe. I have autistic children, as well as those with ADD, become more present, calm, and focused. With children with ADD I have noticed that many of them do not breathe into the lower parts of their respiratory system so their energy is not grounded very well in their bodies, thereby creating symptoms of restless or wild energy, and lack of ability to focus and be centered. I have seen TB become a great help and support system with these conditions.

A client, during integration, got up screaming after a 'navel point' was pressed during body-mapping and claimed an 'alien' appeared right in front of her. How do I handle and explain the dark or 'evil' energy that comes up in a session?

It is important that we hold a fifth-dimensional perspective or spiritual consciousness during the sessions in that everything is a reflection of an aspect of our consciousness. So when dark forces, entities, or aliens show up it represents parts of us that are clearing or need healing or forgiveness. The most important thing is to not make them wrong and separate. Yet it is also important to meet our clients where they are at in their consciousness, while maintaining our understanding of oneness. It is good to call on the angels and keep the focus of the breathing positive and let the client know that they are safe. This can be challenging sometimes in the middle of a big fear integrating. So we have to be strong, positive, and focused in the higher reality. Sometimes lost or disassociate energies come for healing and it is good to remind all concerned that we are all the light.



Miscellaneous Questions
QuestionAnswer
Do you believe that the breath has power to change reality through direct manifestation? (e.g. - If I want a sandwich, could I actually breathe that into my here-and-now - without me having to work out all the details with my head). I do.

This would take an extremely high state of consciousness but I believe that with the power of the breath and our focused intention we can do anything! We do not set limits with Transformational Breath.

Why is Transformational Breath not more popular? Why are you not on Oprah or teaching at places like Omega?

I believe with all my heart that I or someone representing Transformational Breath will be on Oprah. But timing is everything; we need to have so much in place before we meet such great opportunities, or the benefits would be lost. This is why I work so diligently to build a worldwide training organization; so it can deal with the influx that would come from that exposure. For everyone else it would be great to employ the tools from "The Secret" and see us telling and showing the world about TB on Oprah's show and any other great stage which is offered ... and for us to really get into the feeling that creates ... tune in!



Miscellaneous Physical Topics
QuestionAnswer
A client has lost his voice for over two months. He believes some trauma moved from his lower chakras to his throat. And it has affected his life tremendously. Doing throat mapping touched off anger but the loss occurred before working in the throat.

It seems pretty clear to me that the life-force or healing energy is moving up client's body and is now active but at the same time stuck in his throat chakra, which for most of us has a lot of suppressed matter stored there. If he were my client I would encourage him strongly to continue to work with TB AND throat mapping, to see what expression is blocked there and let the Breath and Spirit support him in moving through it. We have had folks who've lost their memories or voice, or even sight and hearing, where all have returned after continued breathing. It would be great if he could come to Seminar where I could work personally with him. I know the breathing and throat work will support him to find his "true voice".

A breather is a Muslim in the holy month of Ramadan. He is fasting and not allowed to drink even water before 6:00pm. Is it okay for him to come for the workshop and breathe without drinking water?

I have worked with some on fasting days. It is okay to breathe without food or water. And when they are able they should drink as much water as possible to hydrate and help flush toxins. They can also program the pranic energy to give them the fluid and nourishment they need by claiming this when they breathe and see it happening in the cells.

A participant has ringing in the ears which increases when doing self-sessions. He gets crazy and "afraid" of going into a session because of it.

In that context, my understanding of ringing in the ears is that it is the audible version of the light energy and if folks follow it they go deep inside. So part of the journey is surrendering to it. I would love a chance to help him work through it with more acceptance. It will not drive him crazy and it could very well be a gift he is resisting. I would encourage him to perceive it differently and see what it has to teach him. Like tetany, the more we resist it the more it stays around.

A woman with long-standing laryngitis (10-15 years) and near loss of voice due to vocal cord injury wants to breathe. There is possible childhood trauma and inability to express. Can I breathe her?

Breathing will help her with her expression and throat trauma. It would be great if she took a Seminar. Just wait and see how she breathes and then decide when to work around the throat. It may be right away and you may need to wait awhile. Definitely begin gently and see what happens. I have seen great success in similar cases where the voice returned as such trauma and lack of expression had been integrated.

A man fell off a ladder a year ago and is now a quadriplegic. The last few months he has experienced severe pain in neck and shoulders, and has not gotten any movement or therapy. Can breathing help?

My strongest suggestion is to arrange some way he could work with a Transformational Breath practitioner. Not only would the breathing help release physical tension and balance the energy flow, it also works on the individual's electromagnetic field and can bring in new healing energies. Other quadriplegics I have worked with have felt sensations and sometimes movement in otherwise numb or paralyzed areas after working with the breath.

What do we about nose bleeds in sessions?

Facilitators and I tend to agree that nosebleeds are primarily caused by changes in the hyperbaric pressure -- that their internal pressure builds and causes the blood vessels in the nose to break and bleed. I feel to best work with this, it is important that there be a good flow of breath and energy in the upper chest.



Music
QuestionAnswer
Is there a CD available that does not have the background music? We tried the 45 minute session and found the music distracting.

We currently do not have any guided sessions without the music. We have music without the words. The 100 Breaths to Joy is a five-minute exercise without music that could be repeated. I recommend that you work with a certified facilitator or attend one of our programs as soon as you can so that you do not pattern any unproductive breathing patterns into your practicing.



Other Breath Modalities
QuestionAnswer
Is this breathing technique compatible with the LaMaze, LeBoyer, or other breathing techniques taught to pregnant women?

Yes, many women who learn standard methods find more comfort from using the full diaphragmatic breath of Transformational Breathing during most of the birth process. The benefits of Transformational Breath go far beyond the relief of pain and fear during the birth. It helps integrate the intensity of the contractions and allows the mother to work more consciously with the energies of labor instead of pushing the breath and tightening up.

Transformational Breath is a must for pregnant women who want to give themselves and their babies the most loving and enjoyable birthing experience possible. Many feel their babies are healthier since they have been receiving greater levels of oxygen. Women often report a greater sense of connection and communication with the unborn child. Others believe their ability to be fully conscious in welcoming their newborn child into the world has been improved. The major transition into parenting is often less stressful and parents have a powerful tool for managing the intense demands of parenthood in ways that are balanced and loving.

How does Transformational Breath compare with Rebirthing and Holotrophic Breathing?

Rebirthing is similar in that it uses a connected "circular" breathing pattern in sessions where the client is laying down comfortably. However, Transformational Breath teaches a full diaphragmatic "belly" breath, while rebirthing stresses upper chest breathing. This involvement of the diaphragm supports the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the abdominal organs as well as clearing out the fear-driven emotional "baggage" that is stored primarily in the belly, bowels, kidneys, and sexual organs. The intention of Transformational Breath is to clear trauma from all incarnations and Rebirthing's stated intention is to clear birth trauma. Transformational Breath focuses and aligns the breather with the presence of God.

Holotrophic breathing is focused on investigating and healing the mental aspect of the individual. Transformational Breath is a spiritual self-healing modality, allowing individuals to go far beyond mental healing. Transformational Breath was developed in part after exploring "Holotrophic Breath" along with many other breathing and healing modalities. Unlike the other modalities mentioned, Transformational Breath works with sound, hands on techniques, invocations and positive intentions.

How does Buteyko, a shallow type of breathing, practiced by some asthmatics, compare with Transformational Breath?

The Buteyko or Boutako Breathing Method essentially tries to heal the symptoms of asthma by shallow and slow breathing. This helps relax the muscles that control the pattern, but do not really integrate any of the mental and emotional aspects of this condition. It does not give the breather the oxygen needed for integration. Part of the problem for asthmatics is being a mouth breather. We do use the nose breathing as an option for working with asthmatics.

We understand that the breathing problem with asthmatics is more about exhale and holding on to it with the muscles in the solar plexus. We work directly with that tension and have effective techniques to assist those muscles to relax thereby allowing the old air to empty from the lungs and thus creating more room for the new air (inhale) to enter. We also work on the mental and emotional aspects of the asthmatic condition and find it is very helpful in assisting the individual to resolve the condition on deeper levels. We monitor the oxygen and CO2 balance by insisting on a shorter, relaxed exhale, which keeps the CO2 levels from dropping.

Most folks with asthma who practice Transformational Breath in a committed way find their condition greatly improved or gone. For further information, read "Breath Deep" and come to a Transformational Breath session to find out how this process can support improved health in asthmatics.

I'll be working with a woman who is 7 1/2 months pregnant with twins in her first pregnancy. I read the chapter in your book on pregnancy. To be clear Lamaze is an upper respiratory breath technique correct? Also, do you recommend toning while pushing during delivery and just use the TB method as contractions are occurring?

Yes it is fine and very good to work with pregnant women and right up until birth. It is best to prop them up so they are on a 45 degree angle. If you can find the diaphragm then you can work with it. It will probably be buried by now. The babies will actually be like belly bags so they will provide a natural pressure to bring the breath into the belly. Toning is great during labor and TB is even better during the contractions. I am happy and surprised she will have a natural labor with twins. The modern protocol is to take them out with a caesarian procedure. If that winds up happening then the breathing afterward will help her detox anesthesia and trauma from the surgery. LaMaze is "pushing the exhale breathing" and not effective for integration or to support the labor process.

I have tried the Buteyko method for Asthma and find it to be almost an opposite of your method. Please explain.

Yes, the Buteyko Method is quite different than Transformational Breath. They basically have you hold your breath out and minimize respiration so that when someone does breathe, it is from the need to breathe in and out in a more spontaneous way. This has been somewhat effective for individuals with the symptoms of asthma in helping them relax their strained breathing pattern. However, I do not believe it addresses any of the mental or emotional aspects connected with the restricted breathing problems. In general, my feelings are that the more oxygen in the system the better. Try both TB and Buteyko and see which process gives you the most.

In reviewing a product called the Resperator, I learned that it slows breathing way down. They claim this slow down is very healthful. Also, a product called StressEraser, and the book, 'Breathe Free' seem to go against the Transformational Breath concepts.

Regarding, the StressEraser, they state, 'The worst thing you can do is too big an inhale. The exhale is therapeutic, not the inhale. Exhaling is how you slow your nervous system down.'

Let me clear about several things. First, the exhale is surely therapeutic, but the inhale is therapeutic too, we require oxygen to live and thrive and receive it through our inhale. Second, Transformational Breath doesn't teach one to breathe 'too fast', and we also don't breathe to 'slow down' the nervous system either. Although at the end of sessions our nervous systems are in fact slowed down naturally and we are brought into a meditative state. So, the nervous system actually ends up being 'conditioned' through our practice in much the same way as our heart is conditioned through cardio exercise.

Further, Transformational Breath is very effective in working with stress in the body and emotions because it is done in a different way as those products suggest. We teach to inhale fully, and by also relaxing the exhale fully without any pauses, we create a high vibrational energy circuit in our electromagnetic field which serves to raise lower energy patterns which have been stored in the body – and which for many are physical and emotional stress. Machines can only address the symptoms of stress, like a pill. We address the source of the stress. There are thousands and thousands of people who use TB daily and have no problems as a result. So I would say clearly it is a safe method for those who have been taught to do it correctly.



Oxygen and CO2
QuestionAnswer
How is the breathing pattern of TB different than hyperventilation?

When one feels the lightheadedness that the increased oxygen brings they may think they are hyperventilating. In Transformational Breath, we are very careful not to create the stress and anxiety related to hyperventilation. The most important difference to remember is that the inhale is longer than the exhale and the exhale is as relaxed as possible in Transformational Breath.

Typical hyperventilation is when someone blows or pushes the exhale and lowers the CO2 levels, which creates an alkaline condition in the blood, commonly known as alkalosis. This is undesirable and unhealthy. Because we emphasize a longer inhale and relaxed exhale in Transformational Breath the oxygen levels increase and the CO2 levels stay high as well. Instead of hyperventilating we are super-oxygenating, which creates a desirable and blissful state.

What is the relationship between oxygen and disease states?

There appears to be a direct relationship between a lack of cellular oxygen and a state of disease within the cell. Cancer is along a number of diseases that are classified as anaerobic diseases. The term anaerobic means "without oxygen" and when the diseased cells are infused with oxygen, the cells will stop dividing and die. There are many people receiving "oxygen therapy" with ozone, hyperbaric oxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The most convenient and efficient way of receiving oxygen is by increasing and improving our own breathing. One of the greatest benefits of Transformational Breath is providing an abundance of oxygen to the cells.

How does Transformational Breath compare with oxygen therapies such as Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT)?

When we breathe, oxygen is taken in through the lungs into air sacs called alveoli, and from there "diffuses" into poorly oxygenated blood due to differences in oxygen concentration. The oxygen then binds to hemoglobin to be carried to cells. Very little free oxygen remains in plasma at normal atmospheric condition. This medical fact shows there is a maximum or "saturation point" to the amount of oxygen we can absorb and transport at one time.

Both Transformational Breath and HBOT can achieve a super-oxygenated state. With HBOT, there may be even a slight advantage, due to the speed and pressure under which you bring the volume of oxygen into the blood. This is because HBOT actually increases the plasma levels of oxygen. But the minor advantage ends there. There are conditions where HBOT is not appropriate such as emphysema, certain ear dysfunction, spontaneous pneumothorax, etc.). With Transformational Breath there are NO recognized contraindications. It is conscious breathing after all!

The greatest difference and the biggest payoff is that Transformational Breath heals by creating a high vibrational energetic field through which we receive our prana, also known as our chi or life-force. This allows us to raise our vibration and also consciously recondition any dysfunctional breathing patterns. We can clear emotional, mental and spiritual blocks which manifest as dis-ease. HBOT is not capable of such healing and it is not inherently holistic.

It is best to use HBOT only for those who need it such as burn victims, stroke and spinal cord trauma patients, individuals with carbon monoxide poisoning and those too physically weak to take part in a conscious breathing practice. Proponents of HBOT recognize that it is merely a temporary medical measure. Transformational Breath is a permanent deep healing modality. And it is far less expensive too!

After a session I felt euphoric, confused and motorically disturbed. Limbs tingling, lips numb. I passed away for some time and felt nausea for hours with a slight headache. I was told I reached a hyperventilated state, with an imbalance of O2/CO2 levels and that this might cause neurological effects because it tends to change the operation of the nerve conductance.

Your response to TB was somewhat unusual, and without being there I would say the results were the result of an incomplete session. We carefully monitor the CO2 and O2 levels by insisting on a relaxed exhale which would keep the CO2 levels up. I would love to communicate with your TB Facilitator and get more details from their perspective. TB has a 30 year history of profound results and a shaky first session is not the whole picture.

A client whose father had liver cancer told me oxygen and breathing is good for the body with cancer but not when the person already has a cancer diagnosis. Is this true?

[we had Nadja, a board-certified physician, answer this question.] Cancer cells are very different cells from normal body cells. In many ways they react and grow in different ways than a normal cell would do. This is the reason why they manage to grow so fast and big. (In fact, this is the reason why we have problems with cancer: due to the size and the disruption of normal bodily function). For these cells, it has been found that they do not thrive in well oxygenated areas in contrast to normal cells. They also maintain an environment around themselves which is full of fluid (they grow their own leaky blood vessels to help with nutrients – a process called angiogenesis). There has been a new piece of research which found that if you manage to change the environment around the cancer cell by improving the vessel system in the cancer, the fluid leaves around the cells and that the oxygen can penetrate to the core of the cancer. The cancer actually suffers because of this. In this particular research they proposed giving chemotherapy at that precise time to increase cell death. In practice, this is very difficult to time, as it is very rarely measurable inside the tumor.

What it says to me though, is that the cancer cells do well in an oxygen-poor surrounding and do badly in an oxygen-rich environment. This is indeed a very different way of reacting to oxygen compared to normal cells. As we know, breathing has helped in the cure of different cancers and the above may be a part of the answer why. I feel quite confident in letting someone with cancer breathe. Also, from the standpoint of detoxification the breathing can help the body to clear any impact of previous chemotherapy sessions. As we know, these can have detrimental effects on healthy tissue. Of course, it should always be the client's choice should they wish to breathe or not.



Pain and Pain Management
QuestionAnswer
We have seen tetany but what do we do if it brings intense pain?

Case study notes: Male client, 35 minutes into a gentle session tetany became excruciating pain (his words) throughout his body. Belly was very tight and he wanted to quit, but kept breathing. The tetany subsided only after 1 3/4 hours. His breath was quite open, but with forced exhale in the belly and pronounced pauses at both ends.

Let the client know that the tetany represents a fear response pattern and also one of holding on. The best thing is to focus on relaxing his exhale and not in a controlled way. If energy and tension build up in the session then tone until they release. Try to find the muscles that are tightening up and work on relaxing them (e.g. placing pressure on the restricted area during inhale and exhale). A good way to start in a gentler fashion is to have them yawn and then sigh, this opens the breath up slowly and from there you can connect the breath in a gentler pace. The tetany, no matter how pronounced, is not a cause for concern.

A breather has noticed that during sessions he has strong knee pain. No pain otherwise.

Pain in a specific place (e.g. knee), is about a trauma that is integrating. It could be a surgery or a past injury or just an area that needs some energy for what ever reason.

A woman with severe fibromyalgia said it hurts when she breathes deep and she is very sensitive to almost all touch. Do you have any insights or suggestions?

As far as fibromyalgia, we have had lots of good results with the breathing. It is a lot like approaching chronic fatigue, it takes a bit of time and yet the overall results have been very good. So prepare her – if she likes her session then she should commit to her work with the breath (homework and sessions). It would be great if she could come to a Seminar and breathe with us for a week. It would really do wonders. Go easy on touch, it is not really necessary. Also, look in Louise Hay's book, 'Heal Your Body' and offer her affirmations for that condition.



Physical Injury / Trauma
QuestionAnswer
Do you have any experience in addressing whiplash?

I have known individuals who when they breathe actually feel vertebrae move. However, a whiplash is a serious misalignment of the cervical spine. I would go to a professional who works with the spinal structure to help realign the vertebrae that have been forced out of alignment. But as far as breathing someone with whiplash it will help with the muscle tension that develops in such cases and will alleviate some of the discomfort and provide more blood and oxygen supply to the brain, which is compromised with a whiplash. I would make sure the neck is supported during the session and not do any leg or arm compression. If you had them pound and kick, do so with less vigor. I know Transformational Breath will assist them in feeling better.

Do you have any specific cases where you breathed a brain injured adult?

Yes, we have had a number of clients with brain injuries that have responded well to Transformational Breathing, my own son Solomon included. What I noticed in working with several clients with various degrees and stages of brain injury is that it first brings more oxygen and energy to the head and brain. TB also has a profound effect on the nervous system and has a balancing and calming influence on the overall energy of the breather. Even if the brain-injured client is on a respirator, they can be coached to breathe into their belly and relax on the exhale. The respirator can even be adjusted to function more with the natural rhythm of breathing. TB would also address any emotional trauma involved with the accident that caused the injury in the first place, or issues with subsequent surgeries. One facilitator in San Diego worked extensively with a man who had suffered a severe brain injury years before and was experiencing limitations in speech, walking, and overall coordination. He worked with her for about a year doing a session a week and found great improvements in all those functions. He even invited her to come and speak at the San Diego Brain Injury Association meetings. He wrote an article about how much he felt TB had changed his life. I encourage anyone with a brain injury to work with Transformational Breath and experience all the benefits from full open breathing.

A man fell off a ladder a year ago and is now a quadriplegic. The last few months he has experienced severe pain in neck and shoulders, and has not gotten any movement or therapy. Can breathing help?

My strongest suggestion is to arrange some way he could work with a Transformational Breath practitioner. Not only would the breathing help release physical tension and balance the energy flow, it also works on the individual's electromagnetic field and can bring in new healing energies. Other quadriplegics I have worked with have felt sensations and sometimes movement in otherwise numb or paralyzed areas after working with the breath.



Practice and Experience
QuestionAnswer
I've done your 45 minute session 4 times and have tried rebirthing. During sessions I've experienced pretty intense tetany – even with your CD. It has been painful, especially in my hands but also affects my face and body.

Even though you have done other breathing modalities you have not been personally guided in a Transformational Breath session, which I feel is a necessity for anyone before venturing into a whole session on their own. There are specific things we do in TB that assist folks when they get Tetany, but our technique's aim is to prevent it. Coming to one of our programs and experiencing our style of integrative breathing will allow us to give you feedback on what might be causing your tetany and how to integrate the deep patterns more easily.

I've been doing TB off-and on for 4 years but haven't had those powerful effects or amazing journeys among the stars. Do those powerful moments come if you do it more often or just in the early stages when you've got a lot to breathe through?

One thing to know is that the longer you do Transformational Breath the more oxygenated your system gets and so you feel the physical effects less, (i.e. tingling, tetany, etc.) and also as your patterns in the subconscious mind clear you have less emotional experience and the sessions become a subtle steady raising of energy and infusion of light. One thing I would encourage you to do is a private session with a trained facilitator so they can check how you are breathing. You might not be using the most effective breathing pattern and thereby not accessing the higher states and suppressed material. They will be able to recognize that and help you become more conscious of how you are breathing for your own practice and take your sessions to another level. And, of course, there is nothing that takes the place of our extended breathing programs.

Why is it ok to breathe through the mouth in TB?

Breathing through one's mouth allows more oxygen to quickly permeate the body. It is also easier to achieve a full connected circular breathing pattern established with the open mouth technique. It is important in Transformational Breath to breathe in and out with the same opening, either the nose or the mouth. This is because in Transformational Breath we create an energy circuit by breathing in and out from the same place. This energy circuit is essential in the vibratory changes that take place as a result of our breathing in this way. Breathing in and out the connected way through the mouth also accesses the lower parts of the body and its energy centers, clearing and integrating any issues. In advanced levels of Transformational Breathing, we use nose connected breathing to open and access the higher energy centers. There have been no reports of problems by breathing this way during sessions and it allows many wonderful benefits to occur.

Why does tetany or muscle cramping occur during initial sessions of Transformational Breath?

Muscle cramping is called "tetany". It has a physical explanation specifically related to Transformational Breath and the integration of a certain energy pattern. When someone is in a Transformational Breath session and a part of their body gets frozen or stiff, it represents a pattern of tension that is integrating. Emotionally it represents their fear response pattern that has surfaced. It clears with continued breathing and toning.

Tetany has to do with the way we have suppressed fear and tension throughout our lives. The important thing to remember is not to push or blow our exhale and to try to relax as much as possible especially on the exhale. Sometimes when this is happening it can feel painful or uncomfortable. If this happens, we encourage folks to tone, or make loud clear sounds. This causes the energy to move and the pattern to integrate more quickly. This is a unique aspect of TB in using sound to integrate tetany or any other type of pain. By fighting or resisting, the tetany only reinforces the pattern since it is really represents our resistance in the first place. Each time tetany happens it will diminish in intensity and eventually it will disappear.

Medical dictionaries state that tetany is due to hypocalcemia or low cellular calcium. We have a different perspective of tetany than this medical explanation. We see tetany as part of a fear response pattern that begins to clear while doing the connected breathing. If one can fully relax on the exhale with a clear letting go it will assist in allowing the pattern to integrate more easily. One of the keys is just accepting it as something interesting passing through as opposed to something negative we need to get rid of.

How should the diaphragm move with an inhalation?

The movement of the diaphragm should stretch down on the inhalation. To really use the respiratory system correctly, bring the diaphragm down as deeply as possible into the abdominal cavity. It will almost seem as though you are touching the pelvic floor with your diaphragm when you maximize this movement. The further you bring it down the more space and internal opening you create so that a greater volume of air can enter the respiratory system. This also helps the exhale be more effective. As when the diaphragm is released on the exhale, the air is forced out with the change of space and internal pressure. It is similar to a rubber band being pulled and released. So the stronger the pulling down effort is on the inhale, the easier and more effective the exhale becomes.

What is meant by the term "activation"?

In Transformational Breath, the breath becomes activated as the pattern of a connected circular breath is established. When one's breath opens up, the circular breath becomes automatic or semi-automatic. This is a magical time in the session wherein one feels like they are "being breathed". Many experience tingling in different parts of the body and feel a shift in their consciousness. While activated one moves through the perfect process needed at that time to improve their state of being and raise their energy level. The more one is able to relax and surrender during the activated state, the more they are able to receive greater depth and integration. In essence, activation is one's ability to surrender to the flow of the life force through their system.

What advice do you have for habitual "mouth-breathers ", and specifically, one with asthma?

Case Study: We use mouth-breathing in the very beginning of our journey with TB to allow us to access the lower parts of the respiratory system and lower chakras. As the breath opens and moves up we can switch to connected nose-breathing mixed with mouth breathing in sessions, or use nose-breathing to specifically work with the upper energy centers or the 3rd Spiritual Level.

In some cases with mouth-breathing clients with asthma I have actually coached them into nose-breathing early on in their sessions. Nose-breathing with them can allow them not to use the breathing pattern that is associated with their condition. Usually, when asthmatics have an "attack " they breath in forcefully with their mouth and then push the exhale while contracting the muscles in the diaphragm which does not allow the air to release and thus create any internal space for new air to come in. And then they try even harder to get air and the cycle gets worse. Sometimes nose-breathing will break this stressful breathing pattern and will allow the asthmatic to begin to breathe in a more relaxed manner.

Is it safe to do more than one session per day?

After working with a certified facilitator, there is really no problem in breathing more than once a day.

When I follow Judith's breathing pace on the "100 Breaths to Joy" CD, I feel like I don't get enough breath. My typical breath pattern is much slower and deeper. Should I follow the CD or my natural pace?

It is probably true in your everyday breathing that you can breathe more deeply and yet in TB we consider flow more important than volume. It is not as important to get as full a breath as possible as it is to keep the breath flowing without any pauses. The emphasis is on the inhale so that tends make the inhale big enough for the purposes of TB. We also do not need to have all the air leave the lungs on the exhale, just a gentle letting go and relaxation of the diaphragm is sufficient to accomplish the energy needed for the integration that happens in TB.

On the "100 Breaths to Joy" CD the next inhalation comes immediately after finishing the exhalation, making my pauses as non-existent as possible. Is that correct?

Yes. The reason for the breathing without any pauses during TB has to do with the electromagnetic circuit that is being created by that particular breathing pattern. If one pauses between the inhale / exhale or the exhale / inhale it breaks that circuit. It is that high energy that produces the permanent energetic changes that one experiences in the TB sessions.

Is there something magical or important about the number 100 in the "100 Breaths"? Does it take that many to effect the desired physiological response or is the number arbitrary?

There is no real significance. It represents a number of breaths that one can do on their own without going too deeply into the process and yet by doing the 100 breaths, one can begin to feel the many gifts that lie within the experience of Transformational Breath.

I've been struggling with frequent deep breaths, yawning, and sighing. I have to keep taking several deep breaths to finally get a "satisfying" one.

Case Study notes: Client reports that conventional doctors have turned up nothing. She has had pulmonary function tests, a CT scan of the lungs to look for clots, an ultrasound of the heart, an EKG, a check for a PFO (hole in the heart), and for hypoglycemia. Client has anxiety but reports that this happens even at times when completely relaxed. Hunger seems to bring it on more.

It sounds as if you are simply not using your respiratory system effectively. None of the medical experts you have consulted are proficient in that information. If you were trained to breathe more optimally (i.e. full diaphragmatic breaths), you would get all the oxygen your system needs and more. The fact that you are feeling anxiety shows me your are not breathing the most effective way. Transformational Breath would not only give you better oxygen supply but would also be able to resolve those emotions as well. I would suggest attending a week Seminar or a series of 5 or 6 sessions so that you would be able to do TB on your own after that.

Why do some people feel nausea while breathing? Is it really okay if we throw up?

Nausea and even vomiting are seen occasionally in TB sessions. Usually it represents emotions that have been "gagged" down and the vomiting reflex is a way of allowing these emotions to come up. It is perfectly acceptable and no cause for concern.



Pregnancy
QuestionAnswer
Is this breathing technique compatible with the LaMaze, LeBoyer, or other breathing techniques taught to pregnant women?

Yes, many women who learn standard methods find more comfort from using the full diaphragmatic breath of Transformational Breathing during most of the birth process. The benefits of Transformational Breath go far beyond the relief of pain and fear during the birth. It helps integrate the intensity of the contractions and allows the mother to work more consciously with the energies of labor instead of pushing the breath and tightening up.

Transformational Breath is a must for pregnant women who want to give themselves and their babies the most loving and enjoyable birthing experience possible. Many feel their babies are healthier since they have been receiving greater levels of oxygen. Women often report a greater sense of connection and communication with the unborn child. Others believe their ability to be fully conscious in welcoming their newborn child into the world has been improved. The major transition into parenting is often less stressful and parents have a powerful tool for managing the intense demands of parenthood in ways that are balanced and loving.

A 3 months pregnant woman had some bleeding the day after a session. Her doctor said to quit because her position lying down 'cuts off an important blood flow to the baby'. Any truth?

At three months pregnant the baby is smaller than a peach and would not cut off blood supply. From five months on that would be a consideration. The best position then for pregnant women is propped up, both for comfort and to not put pressure on an artery. But even if there were pressure that would not cause spotting. I believe it was a detox; a cleansing of old blood and nothing to be concerned about. The breathing would not hurt the baby or her in any way. If someone aborted after a session it would be the body releasing something that was not okay to begin with and to trust that. So far to my knowledge, that has never happened. I feel for many reasons it is good for pregnant women to do TB, release their birth trauma, give the baby more oxygen, and better energy flow and nutrients. So I am sorry the doctor was so poorly informed.

A person is 8 months pregnant. Where is the cutoff time when they are too far along to do Transformational Breathing? What special considerations do we need to know?

There is no problem breathing an 8 month pregnant woman. But I would make sure there is no history of heavy drug use or those toxins could be released into the baby during a session. Also, please make sure she is propped up (at least a 60 degree angle), so that the weight of the baby is not on an artery. Also, no body-mapping the belly and abdomen, although slight pressure is fine in those areas. It is fine for them to tone and move and yet not too wildly. Do not body-map the shoulder points or the inner lower legs as both these spots stimulate contractions. Breathing that far into a pregnancy is a wonderful way to bond with the child and integrate any fears around the delivery and pending parenthood.

My nephew is 4 1/2. His anger seems to be growing, greatly testing my sister. Is it just age or is breathing part of the issue?

Background on the birth and pregnancy: The mother had high blood pressure intermittently during the pregnancy (her 1st), high enough to induce labor at 37 weeks. It took 2 1/2 days of drugs to get into labor. Once induced, no other drugs. Labor was about 6 hours. The nephew had a deep 10 centimeter bruise on his head at delivery.

Comments: It sounds as if he was not allowed to be born organically at his own cosmic rhythm and could have anger issues over that. I do know that my one induced child was the angriest. However, if you can get him to breathe that would be great. Bribes sometimes work to get children motivated to work on their issues. I used to send my kids to a 'breath time out' when misbehaving and after 100 breaths they usually had a different attitude.

I have a client in her first trimester of pregnancy. Can I body map the belly?

It is fine to work with her at this stage of pregnancy and I would do only gentle pressure on the tummy and abdomen areas. Also do not press on any points around the inner ankles or calves, those spots too will stimulate contractions.

Isn't it more difficult to observe breath in the belly as the uterus grows?

It is actually easier to observe belly breathing as the pregnancy progresses as the baby acts as a belly bag and supports the movement of the diaphragm and lower respiratory system.

A client gave birth via caesarian 2 weeks ago. The healing process after the C-sect was not smooth – many complications. Would it be prudent to allow her time to recuperate before breathing with her?

My last delivery was caesarian and it was in many ways the hardest birth. My son slipped back in and they had to do another incision as well, so I retired with a cross on my uterus. It was the breathing that got me well on the road to recovery and healed the emotional trauma of feeling attacked by the knife that cut me but ultimately saved our lives. And yet my subconscious did not know that. I suggest for your client some gentle open connected breathing as soon as she is willing. And obviously no body-mapping from the waist down because of the risk of uterine contractions. It will help detox her (so much anesthesia), and bring the life-force (prana) there to heal. It would be good to breathe the baby too as it was quite a journey for it.

I'll be working with a woman who is 7 1/2 months pregnant with twins in her first pregnancy. I read the chapter in your book on pregnancy. To be clear Lamaze is an upper respiratory breath technique correct? Also, do you recommend toning while pushing during delivery and just use the TB method as contractions are occurring?

Yes it is fine and very good to work with pregnant women and right up until birth. It is best to prop them up so they are on a 45 degree angle. If you can find the diaphragm then you can work with it. It will probably be buried by now. The babies will actually be like belly bags so they will provide a natural pressure to bring the breath into the belly. Toning is great during labor and TB is even better during the contractions. I am happy and surprised she will have a natural labor with twins. The modern protocol is to take them out with a caesarian procedure. If that winds up happening then the breathing afterward will help her detox anesthesia and trauma from the surgery. LaMaze is "pushing the exhale breathing" and not effective for integration or to support the labor process.



Sex and Sexuality
QuestionAnswer
A client had experienced significant sexual abuse from ages 12 - 18 by her father. How do we approach such a sensitive issue?

Background: Client is about 50, with two grown daughters (all doing fine). She had actually come in for chronic stress and pain in her neck. She has only shared the trauma with her husband and her sister. She is on medicine for depression, insomnia, and high cholesterol.

So use all the wonderful techniques we have to get her activated and be sensitive to her situation, which I know you already are. It is also important that she not fall short so a three or four session commitment would be good. Your intuition will guide you. Sometimes abuse clients will do pelvic rocking or lower body movements. Leg compression would be good for that and lower bodymapping. Affirmations of forgiveness are good too. I know she will have great and powerful sessions.

A therapist for sex abuse and trauma was concerned about people getting activated and ungrounded during the '100 Breaths', stating real healing takes place when people stay in the 'window of tolerance' and not go into hyper-arousal.

It is not unusual for abused women to not be grounded. Most of them have shut down their lower respiratory system and do not breathe in their bellies, as that is where the sexual trauma is stored. I tend to agree that once you have them start breathing in the abdominal areas that they would more than likely activate and go into some pretty big pieces. They can use TB to access and clear those traumas. I would explain that to the therapist and group and if they were comfortable with going ahead then great. I would also make yourself available for deeper work if they wanted it. Otherwise, it's like opening Pandora's box with no remedy.

Reply: Yes, it is good to go there and will be resolved if you keep breathing. The important thing is that you have enough time and 'manpower' to breathe and help while things are integrating.



Spiritual
QuestionAnswer
Is a Transformational Breath session like a near-death experience?

This is really the integration of a pattern called "the unconscious source or death urge". This is when the breather stops breathing for a while and their awareness goes to a higher dimension. This is the healing of ones desire to go back into spirit. The leaving and coming back lessens the desire to leave until that desire is cleared. This is a relatively pleasant experience. Most do not remember their leaving, but have a recollection of coming back and feeling like they went somewhere with no memories of what happened. Eventually the pattern integrates and then as the process evolves, we leave the body awareness to access higher states of consciousness and establish pathways to those states. Since we are pioneering the understanding of integrating this type of experience, there is little known or written about it. There is more information in Judith's book "Breathe Deep, Laugh Loudly" explaining the process a bit more.

As a facilitator, how do we handle a client's huge arousal of "Kundalini Energy ". I have seen fear and avoidance of sessions when this occurs.

Experiencing Kundalini energy is not unusual in TB. As a matter of fact, the movement of the Kundalini energy is one of the main activities that happens in a TB session. As the breath opens up from the bottom of the respiratory system to the top, it activates the movement of the life-force, i.e. Kundalini energy. In times past, people have been warned about the dangers of the Kundalini energy opening too fast. I can understand that concern. However, when the raising of this energy happens from bottom up, coordinated with the movement of their breath, it happens in a safe and integrated way.

The raising of this energy represents the raising of one's consciousness and the opening of the corresponding chakras. If it were my client I would let them know that in TB sessions it is a safe and regulated way to raise the Kundalini. It is guided and supported by our higher selves and Beings of Light that have been invoked. Part of our enlightenment process is the raising of this energy and using it wisely in our lives.

A breather had a Near Death Experience (NDE) and was nervous about starting TB, and then continuing with sessions?.

I have worked with a number of people who have had NDEs and have found those experiences to be part of the Unconscious Death or "Source" Urge trying to integrate. It can be scary to leave your body if you do not know what is happening and yet it is quite a valuable piece to integrate, and breathing through it is not only efficient but a very effective way to clear that pattern. Regarding such clients discontinuing TB, there seems to be a big issue of losing control involved and understandably so. By continuing to breathe, the folks have the opportunity to integrate the unconscious desire to leave the physical, by leaving for a while and coming back, until the pattern has fully integrated. If that pattern is not taken care of it can create accidents, life threatening disease, and lack of energy to be in this world. It is important to work with it consciously then have it surface in one's life spontaneously at any time.

What can you tell about the spiritual progress people make by using these breathing techniques?

You have asked a big question that has many answers. The spiritual experiences people have in this process are truly amazing. One of the questions on our Facilitator exams is for them to describe their most Spiritual experience. You would be amazed at some of the places people have gone in their sessions. To the far corners of the Universe, to being with every Spiritual Master and Angel you could imagine, to experiencing themselves as pure light, and on and on. One day I hope to publish a book with all those amazing stories. The main reason for such Spiritual expansion has to do with the fact that in TB, we first open our breathing, which then allows us to clear the negative patterns in the subconscious which then opens the space to access the spiritual levels more easily. I invite you to experience this journey with your breath and see where it takes you.



Stress and Sleep Disorders
QuestionAnswer
How can Transformational Breath affect apnea?

Transformational Breath is very good for sleep apnea. It helps integrate the unconscious death urge or the return to source urge. When individuals stop breathing and leave their bodies, they are responding to their desire (conscious or unconscious) to return to source. When they are able to leave briefly during a session, this desire is satisfied. Drugs will not really resolve that condition as it is an unfulfilled desire trying to complete. Facilitators allow space in sessions to facilitate this leaving of the body to integrate this pattern. They know that deep healing is taking place. Eventually they will encourage individuals to continue breathing and reaffirm the client's acceptance of being in a physical body experience.



Terminal Illness
QuestionAnswer
How can Transformational Breath be done with the terminally ill or those in the process of transitioning?

Transformational Breath can be a very powerful tool when someone is going through their transition. The best way is to connect with the spirit of the person and work from that level. Most folks getting ready to leave have a lot of tension and fear of letting go stored in the solar plexus so gently putting your hand there will help relax it. The most important part is to coach them to surrender and relax the exhale. They can mimic your relaxed breath and you can assist them by affirming it is safe to let go and trust. At some point the client will begin to relax and let go. This represents their ability to let go of the body and go to a higher level. Sometimes saying "Ahhh" on the exhale helps create the relaxation response that will help them finally let go. Be sure and call on their Spirit and the angels to guide them in their process of letting go. It is a beautiful experience to support someone going through their transition. It is important that everyone involved in the situation is aligned with the intention to let go of physical life.



Weight and Weight Management
QuestionAnswer
I have an overweight client who is open to the breathing process and enjoys . She does well in private sessions, but in groups her breathing appears lazy.

For the heavy-set woman I would turn her over on her belly, raise her arms and head so that they are level with the rest of her body, and try lying on top of her, just applying some weight until her body responds to the weight. By relaxing more and breathing more deeply, you will be able to tell if she is breathing in her belly if her bottom is going up and down. I would also coach her about what you are noticing in her sessions and see if that corresponds with her goals. That might motivate her more to breathe and be conscious of her patterns that keep her from breathing and achieving her goals.